Dayangzhou, Jinsha and Sanxingdui

The Yangtze River

Map - Yangtze River

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/Yangtze_River_Map.png

Yangtze region major archaeological sites

Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology, National Gallery of Art, Washington

Map showing the location of Dayangzhou and Sanxingdui

Dayangzhou

At Dayangzhou a large rectangular tomb (tomb 1) was found in 1989 beneath a mound. Inside were more than 1000 objects of jade and nearly 500 of bronze.

While these southern bronze casters seem to know the techniques practised at Erlitou, they developed their own distinctive style and possibly a form of proto-porcelain.

Bronze tiger (53cm long), Dayangzhou

Bronze tiger (53cm long), Dayangzhou
Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology, p.191

Bronze head mask (53cm high), Dayangzhou

Bronze head mask (53cm high), Dayangzhou
Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology, p. 189

Major archaeological sites

At Jinsha, on the Gan River, west of Chengdu and about 50 kilometers from Sanxingdui, an archaeological site was discovered in 2001 during building works. Like Sanxingdui it seems to have flourished around 1000, and then to have continued, possibly to around 600.

Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology, National Gallery of Art, Washington
http://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/china1999/map2.pdf

'Oracle bone' from Jinsha

Oracles bones were found here too, but at Jinsha the outer shell of the tortoise was used in divination rather than the flat breast bone used by the Shang at Anyang.

'Oracle  bone' from Jinsha

http://www.art-and-archaeology.com/china/jinsha/ji09.html

Jinsha Museum

More than 800 graves have been excavated at Jinsha with objects of bronze, gold, ivory, jade and stone that are now displayed in the Jinsha Museum.

Photo - Jinsha Museum

http://www.art-and-archaeology.com/china/jinsha/ji01.html

Bronze statuette of a kneeling captive

Bronze  statuette of a kneeling captive

http://www.art-and-archaeology.com/china/jinsha/ji11.html

Gold mask from Jinsha

Gold masks like this one from Jinsha were also found at Sanxingdui.

Gold mask  from Jinsha

http://www.art-and-archaeology.com/china/jinsha/ji08.html

Major archaeological sites

Sanxingdui was discovered in 1987. The finds revealed a previously unknown city that flourished between around 2000 and 1000 and produced spectacular finds now in the museum at Guanghan.

Map - Sanxingdui

Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology, National Gallery of Art, Washington
http://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/china1999/map2.pdf

Sanxingdui site

Remains of houses and workshops were found, as well as a 'palace' and sacrificial area.

Map of Sanxingdui

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sanxingdui_-Converted-.svg

Two sacrificial pits were discovered with bronzes and ivories.

Sacrificial pits

Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology

Bronze masks of human heads, some with gold overlay, may have been attached to bodies made of other materials.

Bronze mask

Whereas this figure is entirely bronze and stands 2 1/2 metres high.

Technically these bronzes, which have been dated to around 1200, are different from the Shang. They have copper and tin and can be made into larger shapes.

such as this spirit tree found in 1986 in Pit 1.

Bronze spirit tree (384cm), Pit 1, Sanxingdui
Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology, p.40.