Beizhao, Shanzi Province

 

In the following century tombs of the leaders of Jin, were discovered in Beizhao (Tianma-Qucun), Shanxi province from the 1990s – pairs of tombs with 'satellite tombs', chariot and horse pit. In addition to bronzes there was a large quantity of jade objects.

Marquis Su's tomb was the largest with more than 100 horses in a pit to the east and 48 chariots in a pit to the west.

Map

http://www.chinaknowledge.de/History/Zhou/rulers-jin.html

Jade and hard stone face covering

The 79 plaques (from tomb M 31) may have been stitched on to cloth. Some show signs of reuse and that suggests that the material was both scarce and highly valued.

Jade and hard stone face  covering

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The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology no. 84

Jade pei pectoral

"The association of pectorals with face plaques suggests an intent to create a formidable display. It is likely that the jades...manifest a completely new approach to the world of spirits and the afterlife that developed in the latter part of the Zhou period." Jessica Rawson (The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology page 252).

Jade pei pectoral

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The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology no. 85

Jade pei pectoral

This pectoral was found in the same tomb (M63) as a small bronze vessel that shows unusual features, suggesting the Jin bronze casters followed a somewhat different path from the Zhou.

The pei has faience and agate beads once held in place by threads.

Jade pei pectoral

The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology no. 86

Bronze gui vessel

The gui (38.4 cms high) is one of four. An inscription says it belongs to the Marquis of Jin. In their belief system showing position and wealth in death was important to secure an appropriate place in the hierarchy of the afterlife.

Bronze gui vessel

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The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology no. 87

Hare-shaped bronze zun

Bronze ritual vessels in the shape of an animal are uncommon.

Hare-shaped bronze zun

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The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology no. 88

Bronze he

On this ritual pouring vessel (34.6cms high) humans begin to appear.

Bronze he

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The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology no. 89